Category Archives: Forest Management

Tree Removal Starts on PG Campus

A small loader pulls trees from a stand on the south side of the Northern Sports Centre. Handfalling (chainsaws) and customized machinery are used to ensure a light touch within the natural forests around campus.

Beetle-kill and hazard tree removal began this week in priority areas at UNBC’s Prince George Campus. The work will continue for the next  few weeks (February 14th to March 4th). If you are on campus please expect  periodic traffic delays of up to 10 minutes, while the contractor ensures a safe environment for both the public and the workers. For more information on this project, read the advisory notice and review the campus treatment map.

Black Spruce Seeds are Sown

Row upon row of styroblocks are filled with black spruce seeds at the Enhanced Forestry Lab at UNBC.

Last year it was western red cedar, this year it’s black spruce. This week staff at  UNBC’s IK Barber Enhanced Forestry Lab, sowed over 2000 black spruce seeds for ALRF. When they are ready in 3 months,  the seedlings will be planted on  wet soils  within Block 22 this spring as a demonstration site for species diversity. Stay tuned as we post updates on the seedlings as they  grow in the greenhouse!

An Alien Invasion

This clump of marsh plume thistle was found at the Research Forest along the South Knolls Trail. It has appeared within the last 12 months and currently measures more than 180cm tall.

Marsh plume thistle (Cirsium palustre), listed as a noxious weed in BC’s Central Interior by the Invasive Plant Council of BC,  is  showing it’s  presence in ALRF’s harvest areas. The plant grows in moist locations and competes with native plants and crop trees. A containment program for this purple-flowered plant is currently underway in the Central Interior aimed at preventing  its expansion. According to the IPCBC  the most effective way to  limit the spread of the species is  by  cutting the plants  down before they go to seed. Other methods such  as biological controls and herbicides are in development.

Last summer, several harvest areas on the Research Forest were surveyed for invasive plants and several  species were found in varying quantities. This provides excellent baseline information to help ALRF monitor increases and decreases in the diversity and abundance of invasive plants and to  implement  strategies for managing them.